History (HIST)

HIST 101. Western Civilization I. 3 Credits.

Introductory survey of Western Civilization from prehistory to 1648, emphasizing major political, social, cultural, and intellectual developments.

HIST 102. Western Civilization II. 3 Credits.

Introductory survey of Western Civilization from 1648 to the present, emphasizing major political, social, cultural, and intellectual developments.

HIST 103. U.S. to 1877. 3 Credits.

Survey of United States history to 1877, emphasizing major political, economic, social, and cultural developments.

HIST 104. U.S. Since 1877. 3 Credits.

Survey of United States history since 1877, emphasizing major political, economic, social, and cultural developments.

HIST 135. Race in U.S. History. 3 Credits.

The historical development of racism and racial ideas and the interactions among Native Americans, European-Americans, and groups of various races from pre-contact to the present.

HIST 194. Individual Study. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 196. Field Experience. 1-15 Credits.

HIST 199. Special Topics. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 220. North Dakota History. 3 Credits.

Survey of North Dakota history. Includes social, economic, cultural, and political history of North Dakota from prehistoric times to the present.

HIST 251. Introduction To Public History. 3 Credits.

Introduction to history career paths outside of the classroom including museums, historical societies, historic preservation, and historic sites.

HIST 252. Introduction to Museum Work. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the variety of careers available and procedures used in museums and historical societies: curatorial, administrative, conservation, research, and educational. Prereq: HIST 251.

HIST 254. The United States in the Long 1960s. 3 Credits.

This course examines the major social, cultural, economic, and political changes within American society and the United States from 1956 to 1974.

HIST 259. Women in European History 1400-1800. 3 Credits.

Exploration of what it meant to be female in early modern Europe: women's options, how women saw themselves, how they were perceived, and origins of these perceptions.

HIST 260. Women In America. 3 Credits.

A survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of American women from colonial times to the present with a focus on the lived experiences of diverse groups of women. CCN.

HIST 261. American Indian History. 3 Credits.

Survey of Native American history, emphasizing diversity of historical experience. Themes include cultural persistence, leadership and activism, and strategies adopted by Indian communities for coping with change.

HIST 270. American Religious History. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the basic issues in American history including the study of Puritans, immigration, church and state, revivalism, civil and military religion, apocalypticism, and new age religion. Cross-listed with RELS 270.

HIST 271. Introduction to Latin American History. 3 Credits.

Study of important social, economic, and cultural developments in Latin American history. Emphasizes the socio-economic and cultural topical developments and the political and international factors influencing the region.

HIST 280. History of East Asia to 1600. 3 Credits.

The history of East Asia to 1600, focusing on the political, economic, and cultural phenomena critical to the development of traditional China, Japan, and Korea.

HIST 281. History of East Asia from 1600. 3 Credits.

The history of modern East Asia from 1600 to the present, focusing on the political, economic, and cultural phenomena critical to the development of modern China, Japan, and Korea.

HIST 291. Seminar. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 292. Study Abroad. 1-15 Credits.

HIST 294. Individual Study. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 299. Special Topics. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 320. History of Christianity. 3 Credits.

Major developments in the Christian religion including scriptures, persecution, monasticism, papacy, Reformation, science and religion, and the ecumenical movement. Cross-listed with RELS 320.

HIST 352. Museum Collections Management. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the fundamental principles of museum collections management, registration, and preservation issues in museums through lectures, hands-on practice, and field trips. Prereq: HIST 251.

HIST 355. History of Global Islam. 3 Credits.

Examination of the foundational history, texts, laws and rituals of Islam, in addition to the lived experience of Islam and related political dynamics in the Middle East, Europe, Asia, Africa and North America.

HIST 379. Study Tour Abroad. 1-6 Credits.

HIST 381. Australia & New Zealand. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive, but not exhaustive, historical comparison of Australia and New Zealand with emphasis on formation of national identity(ies). Organized topically to facilitate comparisons.

HIST 382. Canada. 3 Credits.

Topical treatment of the history of Canada, beginning with First Nations and charting the evolution of a bi-cultural, multi-cultural nation-state.

HIST 390. Historical Research and Writing. 3 Credits.

Techniques and skills of historical research and writing. Includes researching in libraries and archives, constructing thesis statements, outlining papers, building logical arguments, writing clear and concise English, using primary sources, footnoting, and copyediting. Prereq: ENGL 120, junior standing.

HIST 391. Seminar. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 392. Study Abroad. 1-3 Credits.

HIST 394. Individual Study. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 396. Field Experience. 1-15 Credits.

HIST 399. Special Topics. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 401. Archival Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

Archival theory and its practical application in supervised projects utilizing the resources of the Institute for Regional Studies and University Archives.{Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 601.}.

HIST 403. Archival Preservation. 3 Credits.

This course examines the history, theory and practice of archival preservation, which includes the preservation of manuscripts, photographs, audio-visual and electronic records. Prereq: HIST 251. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 603.}.

HIST 404. Digital History. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on creating digital history, and incorporate readings, discussion, digital fundamentals, creative thinking, and hands-on-learning in a collaborative environment and develop a project based on local history resources. Prereq: at least junior standing. {Also offered at the graduate level - HIST 604}.

HIST 415. Public Memory and Memorialization in America. 3 Credits.

This course examines the construction of public memory and the culture of memorialization in the United States from its earliest years to the present. Among other topics, we will consider how public memory is created, how it changes over time, and how historical and modern-day monuments and memorials came to be constructed.

HIST 420. Colonial American History. 3 Credits.

American history from the Pre-Columbian period through 1763. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 620.}.

HIST 421. Revolutionary America. 3 Credits.

This course examines the causes, process, and effects of the American Revolution from roughly 1763 through 1829. Among other topics, lectures and readings will consider how British authority collapsed, the ideological and economic origins of republicanism, the effects of the Revolution on social, racial, and gender hierarchies, the contested creation of a new republic in its wake, and the economic and social development of the United States in its formative decades. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 621.}.

HIST 422. U.S. History 1829-1917 I. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of the United States 1829-1877; emphasizing socioeconomic change, the Sectional Crisis, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 622.}.

HIST 423. U.S. History 1829-1917 II. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of the United States 1877-1917; emphasizing industrialization, urbanization, and progressive reform. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 623.}.

HIST 424. U.S. History 1917-Present I. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of the United States 1917-1960; emphasizing the New Deal, the world wars, and the Cold War era. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 624.}.

HIST 425. U.S. History 1917-Present II. 3 Credits.

Political, social, diplomatic, and economic history of the United States since 1960; emphasizing foreign policy, domestic developments, and socioeconomic change. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 625.}.

HIST 426. Women in American History. 3 Credits.

A survey of political, social, economic, and cultural development of American women from colonial times to the present with a focus on the lived experiences of diverse groups of women. Central themes are: the incongruity of ideal and reality, the fluidity of gender expectations and the "public" sphere, women's ability to navigate different power structures successfully, work and sexual division of labor, and the role family and personal life. Cross-listed with WGS 426. {Also available for graduate credit - See HIST 626.}.

HIST 428. War and Society in Early America. 3 Credits.

This course examines the fundamental changes that military conflict wrought on American society from the seventeenth century through the Civil War. Among other topics, readings and discussions will consider the effects of war on gender roles, ideas of racial difference, social and economic organization, imperial and national politics, and early America's relationship to the rest of the world. {Also available for graduate credit - See HIST 628.}.

HIST 430. Prairie Earth, Prairie Homes: A Field School. 3 Credits.

Exploration, investigation, and restoration of earth buildings on the northern plains. Students study the cultures that created earth buildings; encounter the buildings as cultural artifacts; and engage in hands-on restoration work. Prereq: Junior standing. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 630.}.

HIST 431. The North American Plains. 3 Credits.

Historical treatment of the Great Plains of North America as an international region, comprising the Canadian prairies and the American plains. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 631.}.

HIST 434. Environmental History. 3 Credits.

Traces the changing relationship between human cultures and the natural world through time, mainly in North America. Examines the causes and consequences of major changes to landscapes and plant and animal species and ecosystems, analyzes the emergence of the conservation and environmental movements, identifies shifts in environmental thought, and traces the development of environmental laws and policies. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 634.}.

HIST 435. World Environmental History. 3 Credits.

The course examines the relationship between peoples and their environment over time in selected areas of the world. It focuses on the past two thousand years from the Roman Empire to the present. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 635.}.

HIST 436. American Frontier to 1850. 3 Credits.

Early American frontier from 1500's to mid-1800's, emphasizing Indian-White relations, colonial wars, social life in the backcountry, and exploration and settlement. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 636.}.

HIST 437. American West Since 1850. 3 Credits.

Centers on a century of enormous change in the trans-Mississippi west. Major topics include the Plains Indian wars, post-conquest Indian history, mining, cattle, homesteading frontiers, the urban West, and environmental history. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 637.}.

HIST 440. The Ottoman Empire. 3 Credits.

This course examines the growth of the Ottoman Empire after 1300 and then analyzes its responses to a variety of challenges after 1683. We examine Balkan states such as Greece and Serbia, Arab lands such as Iraq and Egypt, and Turkey itself. Topics examined include the role of Islam in Ottoman administration, the rights of religious minorities such as Christians and Jews, and the evolution of Arab nationalism. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 640.}.

HIST 450. Ancient History. 3 Credits.

Cultural, political, economic, and social history of the ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 650.}.

HIST 451. Medieval History. 3 Credits.

Cultural, political, economic, and social history of the Middle Ages. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 651.}.

HIST 454. Renaissance And Reformation. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of continental Europe from 1400 to 1650; with a focus on Renaissance and Reformation. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 654.}.

HIST 455. The Eighteenth Century. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of continental Europe from 1650 to 1815; with a focus on Enlightenment and French Revolution. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 655.}.

HIST 456. Europe 1815-1914. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of Europe from the defeat of Napoleon to outbreak of World War I. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 656.}.

HIST 457. Europe Since 1914. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of Europe including World War I, the Russian Revolution, Nazism, World War II, and the postwar era. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 657.}.

HIST 464. Imperial Spain. 3 Credits.

The history of Spain as a global imperial power, beginning with the marriage of Ferdinand and Isabella in 1469 and concluding with the Latin American wars for independence in the early nineteenth century. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 664.}.

HIST 465. Germany since 1750. 3 Credits.

This course traces the evolution of the main German-speaking regions of Europe into modern, industrialized nation-states. From the time of Bach to the fall of the Berlin Wall and beyond, we analyze key trends and events in the politics, society, and culture of Prussia, Imperial Germany, the Weimar Republic, Austria, the Nazi dictatorship, East and West Germany, and the expanded Federal Republic after 1989. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 665.}.

HIST 466. History Of Russia I. 3 Credits.

Cultural, diplomatic, intellectual and political history of Russia; evolution of the Russian state, expansion of Imperial Russia, Great Reforms, populism, and socialism.

HIST 467. History Of Russia II. 3 Credits.

Cultural, diplomatic, intellectual, and political history of Russia and the Soviet Union; agriculture, industry, Marxism in Russia, revolution of 1905 and 1917, and the Soviet Union from Lenin to present. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 667.}.

HIST 470. Modern Latin America I. 3 Credits.

Examines the social, economic, political, and cultural developments in Latin American history. Begins with the wars of independence (circa 1800) and concludes with the emergence of modern states at the close of the 19th century. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 670.}.

HIST 471. Modern Latin America II. 3 Credits.

Study of important social, economic, political, and cultural developments in Latin America from the late 19th century through the modern epoch. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 671.}.

HIST 473. Colonial Mexico. 3 Credits.

Study of the important social, economic, political, and cultural developments in Mexican history from the pre-Columbian epoch through the wars for independence, ending in 1821. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 673.}.

HIST 474. Modern Mexico. 3 Credits.

Study of the important social, economic, political, and cultural developments in Mexican history from independence in 1821 through the contemporary era. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 674.}.

HIST 475. The Aztec, Maya, and Inca. 3 Credits.

The history of native peoples in Latin America, including the Aztec, Maya, and Inca, from the pre-Columbian era to the present day. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 675.}.

HIST 477. Slavery in the Atlantic World. 3 Credits.

This course examines the social, economic, political, and cultural aspects of the history of slavery in the Atlantic world from the 1400s to 1888 with an emphasis on Brazil and the Caribbean. {Also offered for graduate credit - see HIST 677.}.

HIST 479. Study Tour Abroad. 1-6 Credits.

HIST 480. History of Modern China from 1600. 3 Credits.

The history of modern China from 1600 to the present focusing on the expansion of China's empire, confrontation with the West, and the dramatic political and social changes of the 20th century.

HIST 481. History of Japan. 3 Credits.

This course surveys the history of Japan from its myths of creation to the present, focusing on the development of traditional Japanese culture, the rise of the samurai, Japan's response to the West, and the militarization and modernization of Japan during the 20th century.

HIST 482. Vietnam: 125 Years of Conflict. 3 Credits.

The history of Vietnam from the 1850s to the present focusing on French colonial rule, American involvement in the region, revolutionary warfare, and Vietnam's emergence as an autonomous, independent state.

HIST 484. Cultures and Civilizations of the Pre-modern World. 3 Credits.

This course examines the history of human societies in the pre-modern world until 1500, focusing particularly upon the cultural, social, economic and intellectual developments catalyzed by the rise and evolution of civilizations across the globe.

HIST 485. Cultural Exchange and the Making of the Modern World. 3 Credits.

This course examines the globalization of the modern world since 1200, focusing particularly upon the cultural, social, economic and biological exchanges catalyzed by exploration, colonialism, and 19th and 20th century Diasporas.

HIST 489. Senior Seminar. 3 Credits.

Capstone experience focused on understanding major concepts and applying knowledge of basic methods and problems. Students evaluate secondary literature, conduct primary research, and master standard forms of historical writing. Prereq: HIST 390.

HIST 491. Seminar. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 492. Study Abroad. 1-15 Credits.

HIST 494. Individual Study. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 496. Field Experience. 1-15 Credits.

HIST 499. Special Topics. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 601. Archival Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

Archival theory and its practical application in supervised projects utilizing the resources of the Institute for Regional Studies and University Archives. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 401.}.

HIST 603. Archival Preservation. 3 Credits.

This course examines the history, theory and practice of archival preservation, which includes the preservation of manuscripts, photographs, audio-visual and electronic records. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 403.}.

HIST 604. Digital History. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on creating digital history, and incorporate readings, discussion, digital fundamentals, creative thinking, and hands-on-learning in a collaborative environment and develop a project based on local history resources. {Also offered at the undergraduate level - HIST 404}.

HIST 615. Public Memory and Memorialization in America. 3 Credits.

This course examines the construction of public memory and the culture of memorialization in the United States from its earliest years to the present. Among other topics, we will consider how public memory is created, how it changes over time, and how historical and modern-day monuments and memorials came to be constructed.

HIST 620. Colonial American History. 3 Credits.

American history from the Pre-Columbian period through 1763. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 420.}.

HIST 621. Revolutionary America. 3 Credits.

This course examines the causes, process, and effects of the American Revolution from roughly 1763 through 1829. Among other topics, lectures and readings will consider how British authority collapsed, the ideological and economic origins of republicanism, the effects of the Revolution on social, racial, and gender hierarchies, the contested creation of a new republic in its wake, and the economic and social development of the United States in its formative decades. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 421.}.

HIST 622. U.S. History 1829-1917 I. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of the United States 1829-1877; emphasizing socioeconomic change, the Sectional Crisis, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 422.}.

HIST 623. U.S. History 1829-1917 II. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of the United States 1877-1917; emphasizing industrialization, urbanization, and progressive reform. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 423.}.

HIST 624. U.S. History 1917-Present I. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of the United States 1917-1960; emphasizing the New Deal, the world wars, and the Cold War era. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 424.}.

HIST 625. U.S. History 1917-Present II. 3 Credits.

Political, social, diplomatic, and economic history of the United States since 1960; emphasizing foreign policy, domestic developments, and socioeconomic change. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 425.}.

HIST 626. Women in American History. 3 Credits.

A survey of political, social, economic, and cultural development of American women from colonial times to the present with a focus on the lived experiences of diverse groups of women. Central themes are: the incongruity of ideal and reality, the fluidity of gender expectations and the "public" sphere, women's ability to navigate different power structures successfully, work and sexual division of labor, and the role family and personal life. Cross-listed with WGS 626. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - See HIST 426.}.

HIST 628. War and Society in Early America. 3 Credits.

This course examines the fundamental changes that military conflict wrought on American society from the seventeenth century through the Civil War. Among other topics, readings and discussions will consider the effects of war on gender roles, ideas of racial difference, social and economic organization, imperial and national politics, and early America's relationship to the rest of the world. {Also available for undergraduate credit - See HIST 428.}.

HIST 630. Prairie Earth, Prairie Homes: A Field School. 3 Credits.

Exploration, investigation, and restoration of earth buildings on the northern plains. Students study the cultures that created earth buildings; encounter the buildings as cultural artifacts; and engage in hands-on restoration work. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 430.}.

HIST 631. The North American Plains. 3 Credits.

Historical treatment of the Great Plains of North America as an international region, comprising the Canadian prairies and the American plains. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 431.}.

HIST 634. Environmental History. 3 Credits.

Traces the changing relationship between human cultures and the natural world through time, mainly in North America. Examines the causes and consequences of major changes to landscapes and plant and animal species and ecosystems, analyzes the emergence of the conservation and environmental movements, identifies shifts in environmental thought, and traces the development of environmental laws and policies. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 434.}.

HIST 635. World Environmental History. 3 Credits.

The course examines the relationship between peoples and their environment over time in selected areas of the world. It focuses on the past two thousand years from the Roman Empire to the present. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 435.}.

HIST 636. American Frontier to 1850. 3 Credits.

Early American frontier from 1500's to mid-1800's, emphasizing Indian-White relations, colonial wars, social life in the backcountry, and exploration and settlement. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 436.}.

HIST 637. American West Since 1850. 3 Credits.

Centers on a century of enormous change in the trans-Mississippi west. Major topics include the Plains Indian wars, post-conquest Indian history, mining, cattle, homesteading frontiers, the urban West, and environmental history. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 437.}.

HIST 640. The Ottoman Empire. 3 Credits.

This course examines the growth of the Ottoman Empire after 1300 and then analyzes its responses to a variety of challenges after 1683. We examine Balkan states such as Greece and Serbia, Arab lands such as Iraq and Egypt, and Turkey itself. Topics examined include the role of Islam in Ottoman administration, the rights of religious minorities such as Christians and Jews, and the evolution of Arab nationalism. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 440.}.

HIST 650. Ancient History. 3 Credits.

Cultural, political, economic, and social history of the ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 450.}.

HIST 651. Medieval History. 3 Credits.

Cultural, political, economic, and social history of the Middle Ages. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 451.}.

HIST 654. Renaissance and Reformation. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of continental Europe from 1400 to 1650; with a focus on Renaissance and Reformation. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 454.}.

HIST 655. The Eighteenth Century. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of continental Europe from 1650 to 1815; with a focus on Enlightenment and French Revolution. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 455.}.

HIST 656. Europe 1815-1914. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of Europe from the defeat of Napoleon to outbreak of World War I. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 456.}.

HIST 657. Europe Since 1914. 3 Credits.

Political, social, and economic history of Europe including World War I, the Russian Revolution, Nazism, World War II, and the postwar era. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 457.}.

HIST 664. Imperial Spain. 3 Credits.

The history of Spain as a global imperial power, beginning with the marriage of Ferdinand and Isabella in 1469 and concluding with the Latin American wars for independence in the early nineteenth century. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 464.}.

HIST 665. Germany since 1750. 3 Credits.

This course traces the evolution of the main German-speaking regions of Europe into modern, industrialized nation-states. From the time of Bach to the fall of the Berlin Wall and beyond, we analyze key trends and events in the politics, society, and culture of Prussia, Imperial Germany, the Weimar Republic, Austria, the Nazi dictatorship, East and West Germany, and the expanded Federal Republic after 1989. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 465.}.

HIST 666. History Of Russia I. 3 Credits.

Cultural, diplomatic, intellectual and political history of Russia; evolution of the Russian state, expansion of Imperial Russia, Great Reforms, populism, and socialism.

HIST 667. History of Russia II. 3 Credits.

Cultural, diplomatic, intellectual, and political history of Russia and the Soviet Union; agriculture, industry, Marxism in Russia, revolution of 1905 and 1917, and the Soviet Union from Lenin to present. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 467.}.

HIST 670. Modern Latin America I. 3 Credits.

Examines the social, economic, political, and cultural developments in Latin American history. Begins with the wars of independence (circa 1800) and concludes with the emergence of modern states at the close of the 19th century. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 470.}.

HIST 671. Modern Latin America II. 3 Credits.

Study of important social, economic, political, and cultural developments in Latin America from the late 19th century through the modern epoch. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 471.}.

HIST 673. Colonial Mexico. 3 Credits.

Study of the important social, economic, political, and cultural developments in Mexican history from the pre-Columbian epoch through the wars for independence, ending in 1821. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 473.}.

HIST 674. Modern Mexico. 3 Credits.

Study of the important social, economic, political, and cultural developments in Mexican history from independence in 1821 through the contemporary era. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 474.}.

HIST 675. The Aztec, Maya, and Inca. 3 Credits.

The history of native peoples in Latin America, including the Aztec, Maya, and Inca, from the pre-Columbian era to the present day. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 475.}.

HIST 677. Slavery in the Atlantic World. 3 Credits.

This course examines the social, economic, political, and cultural aspects of the history of slavery in the Atlantic world from the 1400s to 1888 with an emphasis on Brazil and the Caribbean. {Also offered for undergraduate credit - see HIST 477.}.

HIST 679. Study Tour Abroad. 1-6 Credits.

HIST 690. Graduate Seminar. 1-3 Credits.

HIST 695. Field Experience. 1-15 Credits.

HIST 696. Special Topics. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 701. Methods of Historical Research. 3 Credits.

Techniques and frameworks of historical research, introduction to types of evidence, and evaluation of sources. Taken during the student's first semester in the program.

HIST 702. Historiography. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the history of historical thought, from the classical Greeks to the present, with examination of some of the works of important historians writing in the Western tradition.

HIST 705. Directed Research. 1-4 Credits.

Directed research on the student's thesis prospectus. Taken close to the end of the student's course work. Prereq: HIST 701.

HIST 706. Seminar in the Teaching Of History. 1-4 Credits.

Includes methods appropriate to college-level teaching. Class consists of discussion, demonstration, and practice. S/U grading only.

HIST 710. Research Seminar in North American History. 3 Credits.

This course requires preparation of a research paper. The subject of the research will be within an announced general topic area of North American history. May be repeated.

HIST 712. Research Seminar in European History. 3 Credits.

This course requires preparation of a research paper. The subject of the research will be within an announced general topic area of European history. May be repeated.

HIST 714. Research Seminar in World History. 3 Credits.

This course requires preparation of a research paper. The subject of the research will be within an announced general topic area of World history. May be repeated.

HIST 730. Readings in North American History. 3 Credits.

A historiographical survey of a selected topic in North American history. Topics vary by semester. May be repeated. Recommended Coreq: HIST 701.

HIST 760. Readings in European History. 3 Credits.

Historiographical survey of a selected topic in European history. Topics vary by semester. May be repeated. Recommended Coreq: HIST 701.

HIST 780. Readings in World History. 3 Credits.

Historiographical survey of a selected topic in World history. Topics vary by semester. May be repeated. Recommended Coreq: HIST 701.

HIST 790. Graduate Seminar. 1-3 Credits.

HIST 791. Temporary/Trial Topics. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 793. Individual Study/Tutorial. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 794. Practicum. 1-8 Credits.

HIST 795. Field Experience. 1-15 Credits.

HIST 796. Special Topics. 1-5 Credits.

HIST 797. Master's Paper. 1-3 Credits.

HIST 798. Master's Thesis. 1-10 Credits.

HIST 899. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 Credits.